Thatched Dwellings in Meldreth

By Bruce Huett

This page has been created as a record of the nineteen thatched buildings that exist in Meldreth in 2014.  Of the nineteen houses, sixteen are listed buildings (Grade II).  The three that are not listed are Walnut Cottage at 9 Whitecroft Road, 98 North End and Fordham's Cottage 34 Chiswick End.  There is a separate page on the expansion of Fordham's Cottage.

All the listed buildings were thatched with long straw rather than reed at the time of listing.

Only three have a sculpted thatch feature on the top of the roof: Bluebell Cottage at 41 Whitecroft Road which has a family of ducks and Fordham's Cottage with a bird.  29 North End (the former Smithy) has a metal sculpted bird on one end.

All photographs were taken in late summer 2014.

A series of pages on building materials used in Meldreth dwellings, including a page on thatching, is in preparation for this site.

If anyone has memories of living in any of these houses and particularly of a rethatching, we would be delighted if you could add a comment to the page. 

We are also interested in copies of floor plans of any of these buildings as we would like to develop a page showing the development of village dwellings from their possible medieval frameworks. 

Photo:Fieldgate Cottage 9 Station Road, Late 17th Century

Fieldgate Cottage 9 Station Road, Late 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:Fieldgate Cottage 9 Station Road, late 17th Century

Fieldgate Cottage 9 Station Road, late 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:Meldreth Thatch 3 Station Road, late 17th Century

Meldreth Thatch 3 Station Road, late 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:Orchard Cottage 61 Station Road,  1662

Orchard Cottage 61 Station Road, 1662

Bruce Huett

Photo:63 Station Road, 18th Century

63 Station Road, 18th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:Walnut Cottage 9 Whitecroft Road, not listed

Walnut Cottage 9 Whitecroft Road, not listed

Bruce Huett

Photo:27 Whitecroft Road, late 18th Century

27 Whitecroft Road, late 18th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:30 Whitecroft Road, 17th Century

30 Whitecroft Road, 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:32 Whitecroft Road, mid 17th Century

32 Whitecroft Road, mid 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:Bluebell Cottage 41 Whitecroft Road, late 17th Century

Bluebell Cottage 41 Whitecroft Road, late 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:Bluebell Cottage Detail

Bluebell Cottage Detail

Bruce Huett

Photo:23 Chiswick End which was the Dumb Flea Public House 18th Century,

23 Chiswick End which was the Dumb Flea Public House 18th Century,

Bruce Huett

Photo:Fordham's Cottage 34 Chiswick End

Fordham's Cottage 34 Chiswick End

Bruce Huett

Photo:Fordham Cottage 34 Chiswick End Detail

Fordham Cottage 34 Chiswick End Detail

Bruce Huett

Photo:Willow Way Cottage 9-11 North End, 17th Century

Willow Way Cottage 9-11 North End, 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:Homeland 13 North End, 17th Century

Homeland 13 North End, 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:The Cottage 19 North End, late 17th Century

The Cottage 19 North End, late 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:The Old Town House 29 North End, late 17th Century

The Old Town House 29 North End, late 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:29 North End Detail

29 North End Detail

Bruce Huett

Photo:98 North End, 18th Century

98 North End, 18th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:The Old Bell (originally a Public House) it was called Dormers Cottage in the listing record, 51 High Street, 1676

The Old Bell (originally a Public House) it was called Dormers Cottage in the listing record, 51 High Street, 1676

Bruce Huett

Photo:Keys Cottage 70 High Street, 17th Century

Keys Cottage 70 High Street, 17th Century

Bruce Huett

Photo:Applecote 85 High Street, mid-late 17th Century

Applecote 85 High Street, mid-late 17th Century

Bruce Huett

This page was added by Bruce Huett on 28/09/2014.
Comments about this page

In about 1951, when I was a very little boy - maybe 4 or 5 - we lived in Applecote in the High Street. It was a lovely time for the whole family and the people of the village were warm and welcoming. Mr. Pepper kept the garden, and "Auntie Mead" help my mother with the house and looked after us when we needed it. We took part in local events; I particularly remember Guy Fawkes Night and the "guy" topped off with our American Jack-o-Lantern. I've explained to my wife that it was rather like the folks of "Midsummer Mysteries", only without the ill will and bloodshed.  :^))

By Stephen Schiavo
On 10/05/2017

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